The Blog

Thanks for dropping by! We have curated an incredible collection of the best articles from the leading Emergency Medicine, Tactical Medicine, Prehospitial Medicine, Austere & Remote Medicine authors, as well as Survival Medicine gurus and many others!

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As always, all credit is given to the original author and origin publication.

Blogs

Are Peripheral Vasopressors Causing Too Many Complications?

Marco Torres | Dec 21, 20

Background:  Vasopressors are usually given through central venous catheters (CVC). This, however, is a time-consuming process and placement of a peripheral venous catheter (PIV) is much faster. Each hour of delay has been associated with a 2% increase in in-hospital mortality.2 Using PIV for the infusion of vasopressors can be an effective alternative for time-sensitive patient care in the emergency department (ED). Previous studies, however, have been inconclusive regarding complications of vasopressor infusion through PIV.

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Marco Torres | Jun 04, 20
Peripheral Pressors: 6 Pearls to Not F*#k Up the Arm

Traditionally, vasopressor infusions have been done through central venous catheters (CVCs) due to the hypothetical risk of extravasation injury to extremities when given through peripheral IVs.  The documented risk of extravasation from peripheral pressors is 3 – 6% [1][3][4][5]. Hypothetically, the extravasation rate can be further reduced.  At Essentials of EM 2020 I gave a short 10-minute talk on 6 pearls I have implemented.  This post will serve as a summary of that talk.

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Anton Helman | May 05, 20
EM Quick Hits 18 Conservative Management Pneumothorax, Microdosing Buprenorphine, Practical Use of CRITOE, Canadian TIA Score, Pediatric Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, Safety of Peripheral Vasopressors

Justin Morgenstern on watchful waiting for large spontaneous pneumothoraces, Michelle Klaiman on mirco-dosing buprenorphine for opiate use disorder, Arun Sayal on the practical application of CRITOE in pediatric elbow fractures, Jeff Perry on The Canadian TIA Score, Sarah Reid on updated pediatric surviving sepsis guidelines, Salim Rezaie (Best of REBELEM) on safety of vasopressor administration through peripheral IVs...

The post EM Quick Hits 18 Conservative Management Pneumothorax, Microdosing Buprenorphine, Practical Use of CRITOE, Canadian TIA Score, Pediatric Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, Safety of Peripheral Vasopressors appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

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Marco Torres | Feb 17, 20
One More Update on Using Peripheral Intravenous (PIV) Vasopressors

Background: In REBEL Cast Episode 73, Anand Swaminathan and I discussed two recent studies on the safety of peripheral vasopressors from two large trials [1][2]. An email from good friend Rory Spiegel brought my attention to yet another trial on this topic [3]. I think we can all agree that in patients with septic shock, or shock in general, the administration of vasopressor agents early, can help to stabilize patients and reverse end-organ hypoperfusion.  Traditionally, this has been done through central venous catheters (CVCs) due to the hypothetical risk of extravasation injury to extremities.  The flip side of this is, that central venous catheters are not without their own risks and time to place them can delay a therapy that may benefit patients.

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Marco Torres | Jan 02, 20
REBEL Cast Ep73: Are Peripheral Vasopressors Safe?

Background: Traditionally, vasopressors have been given through central venous catheters (CVCs) in the critically ill.However, the time it takes to place a CVC is time a patient could potentially remain hypotensive. Early initiation of vasopressors may be associated with reduced mortality by increasing end-organ perfusion. Therefore, there has been a growing trend to use vasopressors through peripheral IVs (PIVs).  Running pressors through a peripheral IV has a couple of important benefits including faster time to pressor initiation and no need for invasive procedures (i.e. CVC). There islittle evidence to support the safety of this practice other than one systematic review which included case reports and small case series. Now we have two more papers that evaluate this very question…are peripheral pressors safe?

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Marco Torres | Feb 12, 18
Peripheral Vasopressors: Safe or Dangerous?

Background: We have discussed the safety of peripheral vasopressors on REBEL EM before. In that review by Loubani et al was a systematic review of 85 articles and 270 patients.  95% of the extravasation events occurred in PIVs with infusions running greater than 4 hours and 85% of extravasation events occurred in PIVs distal to the antecubital fossa.  The major limitation of this systematic review is that the majority of the data was derived from case reports and case series and not prospective trials.  The authors of this current study sought to determine the incidence of complications of running vasopressors through PIVs in patients with circulatory shock in a prospective, observational trial.

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